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Educator-created lesson plans ready for synchronous or asynchronous instruction:

Introduction and Launch

Over-arching Question: 

What are the most essential attributes for ground-breaking scientists who impact the future in positive ways?

Over-arching task:

Tell a compelling story of the discovery of insulin in a way that inspires powerful future actions in a selected audience, using the most appropriate medium (graphic story, historical fiction, heritage minute video, radio drama, art panels, etc).

Lesson 1 – The Story of Insulin’s Discovery

Lesson critical inquiry question:

Which details are most important in re-telling the events leading to the discovery of insulin in order to highlight the key attributes of ground breaking scientists who make a positive difference for the future?

Lesson critical inquiry task:

Begin to design the story-board, using Defining Moments Canada’s Seven-Sentence Story Structure, for an inspiring story about the discovery of insulin and the search for a cure to diabetes.

Lesson overview 

In this lesson, students are introduced to the broader story of discovery of insulin through the careful examination of Insulin Discovery Cards, which contain sets of visual artifacts, and using the Defining Moments Canada Insulin100 virtual exhibit. Students work with a set of artifacts and a body of information to create one page/slide that tells of a particular aspect of the story of the discovery of insulin. To do this, they will need to connect the information to the essential attributes for a ground breaking scientist. As the lesson progresses, students will be invited to review and if warranted, revise their list of essential attributes. The lesson concludes with students using the Seven-Sentence Story Structure to create a storyboard that could be used for planning their compelling story. 

Access Google Slide Discovery Cards

Lesson 2 – Introduction to Curatorial Thinking

Lesson critical inquiry question:

Can curatorial thinking help to make sense of information and to more effectively create a meaningful story?

Lesson critical inquiry task:

Organize artifacts so that they tell the story of Fredrick Banting’s life in a way that provides insights into the experiences and influences that helped to make him a ground breaking scientist.

Lesson Overview:

This lesson is built around a belief that schools have a moral imperative to help students become masters of their own knowledge building by giving them the tools to think curatorially so that they a) do not get lost in the morass of information; b) can contribute to our understanding of the past; c) can contribute to positively influencing the future. In this lesson, students are introduced to the concepts of curation and curatorial thinking. Students uncover how thoughtful curation deepens the thinking involved when learning through the study of artifacts. 

Lesson 3 – Finding a Cure to Diabetes

Lesson critical inquiry question:

What are the most compelling arguments for prioritizing a cure for diabetes over other medical research objectives? 

Lesson critical inquiry task:

Construct a compelling argument for a specific audience as to why they should support research into a cure for diabetes.

Lesson Overview:

In this lesson, students are introduced to both transdisciplinary thinking and prospective thinking. They will be asked to use evidence considered from a variety of subject disciplines to construct a compelling argument for why research into a cure for diabetes should be considered a priority. Students will first construct a series of simple arguments focused on evidence considered from individual subject areas. They will then construct a complex argument by considering the intersections between the collection of simple arguments.

Lesson 5 – Scientific Literacy For All

Lesson critical inquiry question:

What makes scientific literacy of vital importance to living a healthy life? (Decode)

Lesson critical inquiry task:

Using scientific literacy, develop an infographic that highlights the best ways to help someone with diabetes lead the healthiest life achievable.

Lesson Overview:

In this lesson students explore what it means to be scientifically literate and develop their own capacity to be scientifically literate in the context of helping people with diabetes lead the healthiest lives possible. They gather, select, assess and use scientific information to make sound decisions about how to best help people with diabetes. Building on their previous learning regarding physical health, students broaden their understanding of living healthy lives, allowing them to expand how to best manage diabetes beyond traditional approaches. Students share their learning in the form of an infographic with a particular audience of interest to them in an effort to make a compassionate difference in the lives of others.