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All Lesson Plans

Bringing the commemoration plan to life

This lesson encourages students to consider how they can best leverage digital resources to create a highly effective commemoration.

Tell me a little bit more…with less

This lesson provides an (optional) opportunity to take students into greater depth as they learn to do more nuanced analysis of the evidence they have gathered.

Getting to know a Juno Beach Contributor

This lesson, with multiple entry points as described above, helps students to select the individual for whom they will develop a commemoration and to begin the process of gathering information about their life and contributions.

Commemorating Contributions and Sacrifices

This lesson introduces students to the concept of commemorations and begins their thinking about what makes an effective and meaningful commemoration.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit and the Spanish Flu

In this lesson students will create a Bio-poem for one of the First Nations, Métis or Inuit people they meet during this lesson.

Inuit Communities in Labrador

Learning about and commemorating the impact of the Spanish Influenza on Inuit communities in Labrador, 1918-1920, using primary source photographs and oral histories; creating ‘living’ memorials and monuments using tableaux and other drama strategies.

The Global Demographic Footprint of the Spanish Flu

The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-1919 produced a large global demographic footprint. Using the geographic inquiry process, students will research the casualty statistics of theSpanish flu from countries around the world and synthesis them into a map to communicate the pattern of the pandemic.

The Geography of the Spanish Flu

Past to present, demography – students will compare the past to present demographic patterns of Canada, and use Spanish flu casualty statistics to project the demographic impact of this event today.

Spanish Flu Case Study

This lesson will explore the impact of the Spanish Flu pandemic on the development of a public health system integrated across all three levels of government in Canada through a civics-based inquiry model with a particular focus on the concepts of political thinking: political significance, objectives and results, stability and change, and political perspective.

Does Disease Discriminate?

This lesson will explore the impact of the Spanish Flu pandemic on marginalized groups in Canada through the examination of statistical data.

Studying the Pandemic

Links to the Ontario Science Curriculum

Public Health Review

Using the knowledge and skills developed regarding the spread of viruses, development and utilization of vaccines to prevent the spread of disease, and the role of Public Health, develop a social media campaign that could be utilized by Public Health in the lead up to the next Flu season.

Public Health

Using a comparative approach, examine the role that Public Health plays in our daily life today when it comes to disease outbreak and control.

FluWatch

Using data published by FluWatch, the Public Health Agency’s weekly reporting on the state of influenza in Canada, students will analyze and interpret the data, looking for trends and influences on the spread of influenza in Canada. Students will also use critical thinking skills to consider the value and use in Public Health compiling and releasing data like this to the public.

Don’t Worry, Keep Your Feet Warm: The Spanish Flu in Ontario

Developed by the Archives of Ontario, with this plan students will study how information about the Spanish Flu Pandemic was created, shared, and understood by Ontarians from 1918-21, focusing on themes of communication, media literacy, and crisis narratives.

The ABCs of Spanish Influenza

Creating a digital or print alphabet book or classroom display to recognize Canadian people, places, things, and events connected with the spread of the flu across the country between 1918-1920.

Plagues in History

Students research diseases, epidemics and pandemics (epidemics that occur over a large geographic area) and connect these to types of diseases, causes, and impact. It concludes with a prediction of how First Nations and Inuit might be affected by contact with Europeans and their diseases and hypothesizes reasons for such effects which can lead to a specific lesson in aboriginal history.

Flus in the News

Students do a clipping thesis in which they analyze how the media reports on diseases. To get used to generating their own questions rather than use the suggestions, you can use the Snowball task (see Appendix). The Clipping Thesis can serve as an opening for a deeper inquiry into the role of diseases in history (see lesson that explores this), the Spanish flu, or within a study of the Spanish flu when looking at media reportage.

Designing and Creating a Digital Commemoration

This lesson encourages students to consider how they can best leverage digital resources to create a highly effective commemoration.

Analyzing Evidence

This lesson provides an (optional) opportunity to take students into greater depth as they learn to do more nuanced analysis of the evidence they have gathered.

Selecting and Gathering Research

This lesson, with multiple entry points as described above, helps students to select the individual for whom they will develop a commemoration and to begin the process of gathering information about their life and contributions.

Understanding Meaningful Contributions

This lesson introduces students to the concept of commemorations and begins their thinking about what makes an effective and meaningful commemoration.

Scientific Literacy For All

In this lesson students explore what it means to be scientifically literate and develop their own capacity to be scientifically literate in the context of helping people with diabetes lead the healthiest lives possible.

Impact of Diabetes

In this lesson students consider factors that impact the personal life circumstances of various people and how those factors complicate the effects of living with diabetes.

Finding a Cure to Diabetes

In this lesson, students are introduced to both transdisciplinary thinking and prospective thinking.

Introduction to Curatorial Thinking

This lesson is built around a belief that schools have a moral imperative to help students become masters of their own knowledge building by giving them the tools to think curatorially so that they a) do not get lost in the morass of information; b) can contribute to our understanding of the past; c) can contribute to positively influencing the future.

The Story of Insulin’s Discovery

In this lesson, students are introduced to the broader story of discovery of insulin through the careful examination of Insulin Discovery Cards, which contain sets of visual artifacts, and using the Defining Moments Canada Insulin100 virtual exhibit.

Insulin: Introduction and Launch

Tell a compelling story of the discovery of insulin in a way that inspires powerful future actions in a selected audience, using the most appropriate medium (graphic story, historical fiction, heritage minute video, radio drama, art panels, etc).

Life Stories – Faces to Graves

Defining Moments Canada is privileged to feature the exceptional work of students from All Saints High School (Kanata, ON), prepared for the 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands. Students from the Ottawa Catholic School Board worked in conjunction with the Faces to Graves Foundation to prepare soldier biographies for Canadians buried in the Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery.

Lesson 5 – Resilience

In the role of museum curator, students will determine what photos and artifacts to arrange and display in an exhibition that connects to the curatorial them of “resilience”.

Sharing a Story Map

A creation and curation activity where students build and share their commemorative story maps featuring 6 focus individuals connected to 6 cities in the Netherlands liberated by the First Canadian Army.

Storymapping

Provides the opportunity for students to design, create and share a story map based on background information on a Canadian servicemen and women who contributed to operations in one of the 6 key cities of this project.

Stories Within the Story

Guides students to analyze story maps from the Project 44 site by connecting individual actions to collective accomplishments using the 7 sentence structure and historical thinking concepts.

Lesson 1 – Commemorating Contribution & Sacrifice

Introduces students to the concepts of contribution, sacrifice and commemoration and explores the resources and tools of the Project 44 site.