Contributing to Defining Moments Canada

DMC is committed to justice-oriented hiring and work practices. We welcome applicants of all identities, and are especially eager to welcome Indigenous, racialized, 2SLGBTQ+, and disabled collaborators. We will support disabled candidates through the application process and disabled contributors through our working relationship as per individual needs as best we can. Please let us know in your initial email if there are specific ways we can ensure this experience is welcoming for you. We also welcome applicants who are emerging in their fields and applicants who have come to their fields in non-traditional ways. 

Projects Currently Seeking Contributors

A Unique Bilingual State: 250 Years of Institutional BilingualismAccepting submissions until March 2025

Historical Content Developers

We are seeking writers, historians, and community experts to collaborate with us on developing historical, analytical, or otherwise research-based content for A Unique Bilingual State, a project exploring 250 years of institutional English-French bilingualism in all of its evolving complexity, from the Quebec Act to the present. The audience for this content is educators and students from K-12/Sec V and into post-secondary; contributors should be comfortable writing for a diverse youth audience on the overarching topic of institutional bilingualism in Canada. We support the development of historical content that is shared in a variety of digital formats, such as articles, blogs, videos, podcasts, timelines, original art, and StoryMaps. 

We invite content developers to propose topics that respond to the following questions:

  1. In what ways is the Quebec Act the ‘defining moment’ in our complex relationship with bilingualism through 250 years of shared history?
  2. How has the pre-existing and growing linguistic diversity in Canada shaped the story of bilingualism in Canadian history?
  3. While official bilingualism has been legal in Canada since 1969, how has it always been a cultural and social reality over the last 250 years?

Proposals may also engage with the following central ideas:

  • Canada’s development has been uniquely shaped by the strong presence of both English- and French-speaking communities.
  • The national and provincial governments have an ongoing responsibility to protect linguistic diversity and rights, and can enact this responsibility through its bills, laws, budgets, and practices.
  • Language dynamics differ across and within provinces and territories; the social and cultural realities, legislation, policies, and programs within each region reflect these differing dynamics.
  • Indigenous languages existed on these lands long before Canada was formed, and their presence—including French and English attempts at their erasure and exclusion—is central to the identity of this place, as is their ongoing revitalization.

We are also interested in content that explores the micro-historical: the experiences of individuals and communities in relation to the questions and ideas above. Such micro-historical topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • the experiences of language minority groups in specific regions (e.g. Franco-Manitobans, Franco-Ontarians, etc),
  • the lived social and cultural realities of bilingualism in specific regions, 
  • specific language laws, and their impacts on groups of people in a given region, 
  • the experiences of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers in relation to language laws and institutional bilingualism,
  • the histories of prominent bilingual institutions (e.g. community groups, universities, hospitals, etc), 
  • the impacts on and realities of bilingualism within institutions (e.g. schools, courts, etc),
  • the impacts on and realities of institutional bilingualism within Indigenous communities, and 
  • specific moments in time—defining moments—that have marked turning points for institutional bilingualism and/or for the lived realities of bilingualism.

We welcome resources that draw entirely on the above questions, understandings, and topics, as well as resources that use the above lists as a springboard or catalyst for new and additional ideas. We prioritize telling stories that are typically underrepresented, silenced, or otherwise untold as part of larger historical narratives, in ways that are anti-oppressive and justice-oriented. We welcome nuance and complexity in engaging with these foundational project elements.

If you are interested in collaborating with us on historical content, please contact Anna (she/her), Projects Manager and Digital Curator, at anna@momentscanada.ca. Applications are considered on a rolling basis while the project is active through March 2025.

Educational Content Developers 

We are seeking educators from a variety of formal and informal environments, including but not limited to classroom teachers, artists, museum and historical site educators, archivists, and knowledge keepers, to collaborate with us on developing educational content and resources for A Unique Bilingual State, a project exploring 250 years of institutional English-French bilingualism in all of its evolving complexity, from the Quebec Act to the present. The audience for this content is educators and students from K-12/Sec V and into post-secondary; contributors should be comfortable with creating material for this diverse educational audience on the topic of institutional bilingualism.

We welcome the creation of a range of educational resources, including but not limited to: unit plans, lesson plans, case studies, handouts, slide decks, conversation protocols, blogs about pedagogical approaches and processes, book and/or film studies, and multimedia tools (audio, video, etc.). 

Defining Moments Canada prioritizes the development of curatorial thinking in young people: the capacity to make sense of and organize information in an information-rich world, and to curate, develop, and tell stories about that world in ways that promote authentic agency and voice. We centre inquiry and student voice in our pedagogical work. 

Our overarching guiding questions for A Unique Bilingual State are:

  1. In what ways is the Quebec Act the ‘defining moment’ in our complex relationship with bilingualism through 250 years of shared history?
  2. How has the pre-existing and growing linguistic diversity in Canada shaped the story of bilingualism in Canadian history?
  3. While official bilingualism has been legal in Canada since 1969, how has it always been a cultural and social reality over the last 250 years?

And our enduring understandings are:

  • Canada’s development has been uniquely shaped by the strong presence of both English- and French-speaking communities.
  • The national and provincial governments have an ongoing responsibility to protect linguistic diversity and rights, and can enact this responsibility through its bills, laws, budgets, and practices.
  • Language dynamics differ across and within provinces and territories; the social and cultural realities, legislation, policies, and programs within each region reflect these differing dynamics.
  • Indigenous languages existed on these lands long before Canada was formed, and their presence—including French and English attempts at their erasure and exclusion—is central to the identity of this place, as is their ongoing revitalization.

We are also interested in content that explores the micro-historical: the experiences of individuals and communities in relation to the questions and ideas above. Education resources that explore such micro-historical topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • the experiences of language minority groups in specific regions (e.g. Franco-Manitobans, Franco-Ontarians, etc),
  • the lived social and cultural realities of bilingualism in specific regions, 
  • specific language laws, and their impacts on groups of people in a given region, 
  • the experiences of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers in relation to language laws and institutional bilingualism,
  • the histories of prominent bilingual institutions (e.g. community groups, universities, hospitals, etc), 
  • the impacts on and realities of bilingualism within institutions (e.g. schools, courts, etc),
  • the impacts on and realities of institutional bilingualism within Indigenous communities, and 
  • specific moments in time—defining moments—that have marked turning points for institutional bilingualism and/or for the lived realities of bilingualism.

We welcome resources that draw entirely on the above questions, understandings, and topics, as well as resources that use the above lists as a springboard or catalyst for new and additional ideas. We prioritize telling stories that are typically underrepresented, silenced, or otherwise untold as part of larger historical narratives, in ways that are anti-oppressive and justice-oriented. We welcome nuance and complexity in engaging with these foundational project elements. 

If you are interested in collaborating with us on educational content, please contact Amanda (she/her), Education Manager, at amanda@momentscanada.ca. Applications are considered on a rolling basis while the project is active through March 2025.

Proud to Be: Queer Canadian Histories of the 1960s-1970sAccepting submissions until June 2024

Historical Content Developers

We are seeking writers, historians, and community experts to collaborate with us on developing historical, analytical, or otherwise research-based content for Proud to Be: Queer Canadian Histories of the 1960s-1970s. The audience for this content is educators and students from K-12/Sec V and into post-secondary; contributors should be comfortable writing for a diverse youth audience. We support the development of historical content that is shared in a variety of digital formats, such as articles, blogs, videos, podcasts, timelines, original art, and StoryMaps. 

We invite content developers to propose topics that shed light on the histories of 2SLGBTQ+ people and communities across Canada in the 1960s and 1970s—decades that were especially fulsome and fraught with impassioned activism and change, as well as harmful retaliation. Proposals can draw connections to contemporary issues and experiences, but should be grounded in the experiences of these particular decades. 

We are especially interested in content that explores the micro-historical: the experiences of individuals and communities in relation to the project’s larger theme. Such micro-historical topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Lesbian, trans, bi, ace, and other queer experiences not as substantially profiled during this time period,
  • Queer Indigenous experiences, including two-spirit peoples,
  • Queer racialized experiences,
  • Queer francophone experiences (inside and outside of Québec),
  • Queer experiences in the Maritimes,
  • Queer experiences in the prairies,
  • Queer experiences in the north,
  • Queer arts communities and movements (e.g. zines, theater, music, dance, literature, etc), and
  • Legislation affecting queer individuals and communities. 

We welcome resources that draw entirely on the above questions, understandings, and topics, as well as resources that use the above lists as a springboard or catalyst for new and additional ideas. We prioritize telling stories that are typically underrepresented, silenced, or otherwise untold as part of larger historical narratives, in ways that are anti-oppressive and justice-oriented. We welcome nuance and complexity in engaging with these foundational project elements.

If you are interested in collaborating with us on historical content, please contact Anna (she/her), Projects Manager and Digital Curator, at anna@momentscanada.ca. We will prioritize queer applicants and will consider applications on a rolling basis while the project is active through June 2024.

Educational Content Developers 

We are seeking educators from a variety of formal and informal environments, including but not limited to classroom teachers, artists, museum and historical site educators, archivists, and knowledge keepers, to collaborate with us on developing educational content and resources for Proud to Be: Queer Canadian Histories of the 1960s-1970s. The audience for this content is educators and students from K-12/Sec V and into post-secondary; contributors should be comfortable with creating material for this diverse educational audience.

We welcome the creation of a range of educational resources, including but not limited to: unit plans, lesson plans, case studies, handouts, slide decks, conversation protocols, blogs about pedagogical approaches and processes, book and/or film studies, and multimedia tools (audio, video, etc.). 

Defining Moments Canada prioritizes the development of curatorial thinking in young people: the capacity to make sense of and organize information in an information-rich world, and to curate, develop, and tell stories about that world in ways that promote authentic agency and voice. We center inquiry and student voice in our pedagogical work. 

We invite educators to develop resources that shed light on the histories of 2SLGBTQ+ people and communities across Canada in the 1960s and 1970s—decades that were especially fulsome and fraught with impassioned activism and change, as well as harmful retaliation. Resources can draw connections to contemporary issues and experiences, but should be grounded in the experiences of these particular decades. 

We are especially interested in educational resources that explore the micro-historical: the experiences of individuals and communities in relation to the project’s larger theme. Such micro-historical topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Lesbian, trans, bi, ace, and other queer experiences not as substantially profiled during this time period,
  • Queer Indigenous experiences, including two-spirit peoples,
  • Queer racialized experiences,
  • Queer francophone experiences (inside and outside of Québec),
  • Queer experiences in the Maritimes,
  • Queer experiences in the prairies,
  • Queer experiences in the north,
  • Queer arts communities and movements (e.g. zines, theater, music, dance, literature, etc), and
  • Legislation affecting queer individuals and communities.

We welcome resources that draw entirely on the above questions, understandings, and topics, as well as resources that use the above lists as a springboard or catalyst for new and additional ideas. We prioritize telling stories that are typically underrepresented, silenced, or otherwise untold as part of larger historical narratives, in ways that are anti-oppressive and justice-oriented. We welcome nuance and complexity in engaging with these foundational project elements. 

If you are interested in collaborating with us on educational content, please contact Amanda (she/her), Education Manager, at amanda@momentscanada.ca. We will prioritize queer applicants and will consider applications on a rolling basis while the project is active through June 2024.

How to Apply

Stage One: Statement of Interest

If interested in collaborating on either educational or historical content, please send:

  1. A brief introduction to/description of yourself, where you are located, and what communities you’re connected to (if you would like to disclose);
  2. A brief statement of interest explaining why you would like to participate in this particular project and a short summary of your proposed work (approx. 250-300 words);
  3. A CV that includes professional and educational backgrounds and experiences.

If you are interested in developing historical content, email this statement to Anna England (she/her) at anna@momentscanada.ca.

If you are interested in developing educational content, email this statement to Amanda Merpaw (she/her) at amanda@momentscanada.ca.

Applications are considered on a rolling basis while projects are active. 

Stage Two: Digital Conversation

If your proposal and experience aligns with our project goals, we will schedule an initial meeting for approximately 30-45 minutes to take place via Zoom or the phone. The purpose of this meeting is to introduce ourselves, chat further about your proposed work and our project, and for both DMC and the applicant to determine whether we would like to move forward with the collaboration. 

Stage Three: Scope of Work Agreement

If both DMC and the applicant choose to move forward with the proposed work, DMC will send a Scope of Work Agreement to the applicant, which includes responsibilities, timelines, and remuneration details. The applicant will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the Scope of Work Agreement. Once the Agreement is revised and approved by both DMC and the applicant, both parties will sign. 

Stage Four: Creating Exciting Work Together!

The best part! At this stage, we work together as collaboratively as feels best for you to support the development of the historical and/or educational content.

This stage includes ongoing conversation with your respective manager and, upon submission of drafts, also includes copy and content editing as necessary.When your contribution is finalized, where possible, it will be translated into French and will appear in both languages on our website and shared via our social media platforms.